A bike commuters' street sign depicting a man flying over the handlebars after hitting a divide in the pavement.

Photo Credit: CC BY-SA/Jeff Kubina/Flickr

On local and state levels, numerous studies indicate that the economic effects of biking versus driving cannot be ignored, reports Elly Blue on Grist. Conservative estimates based upon available data indicate that U.S. workers save themselves $3,000 to $12,000 per year, simply by becoming bike commuters. Every year, the total grows by approximately $1,000.

Bike-friendly communities wanted

The money-saving aspect of biking definitely provides incentive, but it has become increasingly difficult to find bike-friendly communities in the U.S. For those who do not live in cities designed with cycling in mind, a bike commute may only be a dream.

In his paper “Estimating the Economic Benefits of Bicycling and Bicycle Facilities: An Interpretive Review and Proposed Methods,” Dr. Kevin Krizek of the University of Minnesota's Civil Engineering program points out that the way in which cities are built has contributed to the decline in public health and rising cost of health care:

“Sprawling land use practices and resulting auto-dependent travel are themes that now have moved front and center into the American consciousness; the link to public health and the declared obesity epidemic remains an important component of this discussion,” writes Krizek.

In cities with easy-access bike lanes and biking trails, adopting the bike commute routine can benefit the local economy even more than driving a car; plus, it keeps saves consumers money. ... click here to read the rest of the article titled "Economic effect of biking vs. driving is astounding, experts say"