afterburn

Afterburn / Civilian Projects

Once again, the jury for the International Garden Festival, has picked some intriguing contemporary garden projects. Six new landscapes will appear during the festival, which is held at the Redford Gardens, next to the Les Jardins de Métis in Quebec, from May through September. Nearly 300 proposals were submitted by 700 designers from 30 countries.

Afterburn by Civilian Projects, a Brooklyn-based art and architecture studio, features charred trees outlined in a grid formation (see image above). Civilian Projects describe the work as a “post-apocalyptic experience that allows visitors to see how nature renews by itself after a fire and how she manages to heal damaged landscapes.” One team member, Ksenia Kagner, is from landscape architecture firm James Corner Field Operations.

For Cone Garden, a team of designers from Livescape, which hails from Seoul, South Korea, have stuck orange construction cones upside-down into the earth. The cones will be filled with soil, becoming planters. Some cones will become seating. Others will “transit messages to passers-by.” For these designers, the cones represent “the never-ending construction, de-construction, and re-construction of our environment.”

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Cone Garden / Livescape

Canadian artists and designers Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster have created Line Garden, a responsive environment that will change based on user movement through the space. The garden features police tape, twined into new patterns. The team enjoys investigating “everyday urban situations and re-presenting them to be experienced anew.”

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Line Garden / Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster

In Méristème, a plant cell is blown up into a geodesic-dome-like formation people can enter. The piece is meant to remind us of the importance of plant life to human society. This installation was created by Châssi, a team from Montreal, Canada.

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Méristème / Châssi

Orange Secret by landscape architecture firm Nomad Studio from New York City is meant to play with our perception of open and closed spaces. A wooden wall provides a slit for viewing the garden, which prominently features all plants that bloom orange.

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Orange Secret / Nomad Studio

Lastly, the excellent Rotunda by Spanish designers at City Laboratory, will feature a black steel basin meant to slowly collect water, leaves, pollen over the summer. This accumulation will provide food for birds and insects, leading to the development of “new life in the garden.”

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Rotunda / City Laboratory

Since the festival started in 2000, 140 gardens have been exhibited at Les Jardins de Métis in Quebec. Check out these new ones from May 31 to September 28. See more images at DesignBoom.