Sign up | Login with →

Preservation

Are Historically-Black Towns History?

April 17, 2014 by Kristen Jeffers

Historically-Black Towns

Recently, I came across two sets of articles about Historically Black towns in Oklahoma and in Missouri. Part as a means of segregation and part as a means of dignity, self-respect and control of the civic space, African-Americans established or had help establishing their own towns after slavery.[read more]

When Hills Hide Arches

April 15, 2014 by Geoff Manaugh

Hidden Arches

Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient.[read more]

A Safe City is a Just City

A Safe City

As cities in the developing world continue to grow, so do their traffic safety concerns. Latin America now sees three times as many deaths from traffic crashes as Europe, the vast majority of which occur in cities. Vulnerable road users like the elderly and cyclists are particularly at risk.[read more]

Balance is Overrated: An Interview with World Forestry Center’s Rick Zenn

April 13, 2014 by Leda Marritz

World Forestry Center

The World Forestry Center is a nonprofit educational institution that was founded in Portland, Oregon in 1964. Their mission is to educate and inform people about the world’s forests, trees, and environmental sustainability and to increase public awareness of the benefits of sustainable forestry management.[read more]

Minnesota's Evapotranspiration Credit System for Trees

April 12, 2014 by Leda Marritz

Minnesota Credit System for Trees

Last year, The Kestrel Design Group developed a formula for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to estimate evapotranspiration benefits from trees to include in their stormwater crediting system. This formula is one of the first in the country to formally quantify this benefit.[read more]

Placebook: Loving the Un-Loveable Building

April 12, 2014 by Kristen Jeffers

Unloveable Building

In honor of returning to my alma mater (the undergraduate one), North Carolina State University, for our annual PR Day, I wanted to take a moment and talk about its most unusual building. The one I want to really discuss is Harrelson Hall.[read more]

Post-Conflict Reconstruction Is Dead

April 10, 2014 by Mitchell Sutika Sipus

Post-Conflict Rebuilding

 

I have argued that post-conflict reconstruction is a thing of the past, but only recently did I realize that this issue needs attention. There is an inconsistency in language in which I find many planners label post-war reconstruction and post-disaster reconstruction as same things, which they are not.[read more]

Bright Flight From Silicon Valley

April 9, 2014 by Jim Russell

The Innovation Economy is currently moving to where the cost of living is much more reasonable. The anecdotes and data points are piling up, putting the squeeze on talent-starved Silicon Valley companies. In this post is the tale of the domestic migration tape.[read more]

New Friendly Garden Share Project for Bristol

April 8, 2014 by Paul Rainger

Bristol Garden Share

A new Friendly Garden Share project is starting up in Bristol, and is looking for neighbourhood co-ordinators across the city. The project puts owners of underused gardens who would like to share their space in touch with local growers. In return the gardener shares a proportion of the produce.[read more]

Design Challenge: Reconstruct Canada's Busiest Transit Hub without Stopping Service

April 8, 2014 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Update without Interruption

Union Station in Toronto is overdue for a renovation. Last updated in the late 1980′s, it is dated; the connections between the three transit systems are inefficient, and the congestion during rush hour foreshadows the situation in twenty year’s time when ridership is expected to double or triple.[read more]

LA's Little Tokyo Strengthens its Identity by Planning a 'Cultural Eco-District'

April 8, 2014 by Kaid Benfield

Cultural Eco-Districts

The Little Tokyo neighborhood in LA is one of the country’s most important Asian-American communities. Comprising five large city blocks, it has been maintained over the generations with ups and downs, including substantial depletion of population during the Japanese internment during World War Two.[read more]

Bulgarian Syngas Project Launches Construction

April 8, 2014 by Glenn Meyers

Bulgarian Construction

Bulgarian plans to use alternative fuels for generating sustainable electricity are now taking shape, following the start of construction of the Karlovo integrated gasified biomass power plant. When completed the plant will distribute cleaner electricity, using wood waste and straw, to some 2,000 homes.[read more]