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Health & Nutrition

Greening Bus Fleets Requires a Range of Strategies

Green Bus Strategy

In 2012 alone, Latin America saw 131,000 preventable air pollution-related deaths. To reduce emissions and improve air quality, it’s essential that public transit fleets—like buses—become more fuel-efficient by adopting cleaner fuels, like natural gas or low-sulfur diesel.[read more]

Smoking Bans in Parks: Public Health in Public Places

April 17, 2015 by Bradley Calvert

The City of Seattle is currently floating the idea of banning smoking in public parks. This isn’t an unprecedented move, but it is an important one in advancing public health and making our public spaces a little more clean and pleasant. But some believe that this is policing the poor and targeting the homeless.[read more]

13 Tips For Saving Water the Californian Way

April 15, 2015 by The Dirt ASLA

Water Conservation in California

California is a big state. To understand water saving techniques for the average person, we need to understand California’s unique climates and ecosystems. In broad terms, we have South Coast, South Inland, North Coast, Central Coast, Central Valley, mountains and desert climates.[read more]

China's Clean Air Challenge: Public Unrest Forges the Path Ahead

China Air Pollution Risk and Public Action

Toward the end of 2011, episodes of severe pollution levels in China started attracting worldwide attention. Global media employed terms like “airmageddon” and “airpocalypse,” sparking considerable discussion and debate on social media. Four years later, air pollution remains a pressing issue in Chinese cities.[read more]

Urban Farming Ramps Up in Sacramento with Passage of New Ordinance

Local Ordinances and Urban Farming

Food and agriculture activists have something to celebrate this year in Sacramento, California. On March 23, 2015, the City Council passed an urban farming ordinance that paves the way for food security and an inner city agricultural economy.[read more]

Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay to Benefit from Stormwater Management Fees

April 12, 2015 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Stormwater Management Fees

Maryland’s recent gubernatorial election has disrupted the state’s longstanding political paradigm by electing a new governor, Larry Hogan. Hogan promised to repeal a 2012 law that aimed to increase funding for the state’s stormwater management.[read more]

Water and Music, Both Valuable and Both Not Free

April 12, 2015 by Mark LeChevallier

Water Conservation Efforts

Water companies, cities and municipalities invest millions of dollars in their infrastructure to maintain the quality of the tap water. However, after working around the clock for more than 100 years, water and wastewater infrastructure is aging and in some cases, failing.[read more]

Women in Food: Audrey Arner Sees Diversity as the Key to Soil and Water Health

Diversity and Health

Minnesota farmer Audrey Arner believes in the strength of diversity, which is why she worked over time in order to transform a Minnesota farm from a two-crop base of corn and soybean rotation back to its previous, more natural roots of polyculture.[read more]

California's Drought in Perspective

April 9, 2015 by The Dirt ASLA

California and the Drought

Scientists are calling the current wave of drought, which began to spread across California, much of the Southwest, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2011, the worst since the 1950s. While it has ebbed in Texas and parts of the Southwest, California and other states continue to bear the brunt of this epic change in rainfall.[read more]

No Green Without Blue: Riverside Public Utility Emphasizes Water Conservation in Urban Agriculture

Urban Farming and Water Efficiency

The City of Riverside, California is committed to being green, but city officials know that in order to do this, Riverside must also be blue. And with the recent announcement of the state’s first-ever water restriction, it’s fair to say the city is ahead of the curve.[read more]

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Nottingham: The City Where People Continue To Live In Caves

April 8, 2015 by David Thorpe
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Going underground

Nottingham, England, famous for Robin Hood, is a city built on a system of caves that have been expanded by the city's occupants over the centuries for living and working space. Some of them are available for the public to tour, others continue to be used by homeless people.[read more]

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Five Cities with Top Game-Changing Sustainability and Resilience Projects

April 8, 2015 by Warren Karlenzig

Game-Changing Cities

Game-changing mega-projects in these five cities promise cross-cutting impacts including low-carbon mobility, recreation, green infrastructure, societal improvements, and mobile communications. By planning diverse and ambitious results, these resilient plans take years to decades, but promise massive rewards.[read more]