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Redevelopment & Infill

A Cold Ski Town is Building One of the First Vertical Farms in the World

March 1, 2015 by Brandon Donnelly

Vertical Farming Innovation

I have a soft spot for Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It’s a beautiful town and, out of all the places I’ve snowboarded, it’s easily my favorite. That’s why I was excited to learn that Jackson is currently building one of the first vertical farms in the world (and in a cold ski town at that).[read more]

Marriage Therapy for Ecologists and Landscape Architects

February 28, 2015 by The Nature of Cities

Integrating Ecology and Design

Ecologists’ interest start with an exploration of the natural world, its structure and function. Architects and landscape architects start with human needs and how constructed features can answer those needs. Of course you have these different backgrounds, and the training is so different.[read more]

SMART's New Shelter Designs are Even Worse Than Before

February 28, 2015 by David Edmondson

Shelter Design Problems?

SMART may be on the verge of making a serious mistake. Back in August, 2014, the rail agency released its “65%” plans for stations to decidedly mixed reviews. Stung by the criticism, particularly from San Rafael mayor Gary Phillips who called the designs “ridiculous”, SMART went into a long internal huddle.[read more]

Neighborhood Alliance Plans to Convert Vacant Lot into Urban Farm, Housing Complex

February 26, 2015 by Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture

Urban Food and Housing Redevelopment

The Hilltop Alliance, a nonprofit, is working on a project that could drastically advance urban agriculture in the state. The organization wants to turn a vacant 107-acre lot into Hilltop Village Farm, a multi-use development that would include 120 townhomes, a 20-acre urban farm incubator, a youth farm and CSA.[read more]

REVEALED: The Most Segregated Cities in North America

February 26, 2015 by Brandon Donnelly

North America and Urban Segregation

The Martin Prosperity Institute in Toronto has just released a new study called Segregated City: The Geography of Economic Segregation in America’s Metros that reveals the physical sorting and separation of advantaged and disadvantaged groups within cities.[read more]

Your Guide to Urban Cycling: A Q&A with Author Yvonne Bambrick

February 26, 2015 by TheCityFix - produced by EMBARQ

Urban Cycling Interview

As cities worldwide grow and evolve, so too is the urban landscape changing for cyclists. While congested and chaotic streets still remain a persistent challenge for some cities, many others have recognized the need for robust cycling infrastructure and are actively supporting cycling culture.[read more]

Architecture as if People and the Planet Mattered

February 25, 2015 by Taz Loomans

Architecture and Purpose

What if architects designed buildings as if people and the planet mattered? Maybe a developer would hire an architect to design a strip mall. And maybe that architect would insist on visiting the site and meeting with the people that would shop there and the community where the strip mall is located.[read more]

Density is Great, But Walkability Needs More

February 25, 2015 by Tyler Caine

Walkability isn't just about density

A relatively dense neighborhood still needs to facilitate its residents to walk to more than just their neighbors. A mixture of uses that comprise daily destinations need to be within a manageable radius in order to truly reduce net vehicle miles traveled and get people out on the street.[read more]

Congregations Practice Faith through Environmental Leadership

February 24, 2015 by Kaid Benfield

Faith and Environmentalism

A growing, multi-denominational religious movement is placing environmental protection at the center of its teaching and practice. Expressed in part by the phrase "creation care," these leaders believe that protecting the earth is a religious value, and that environmental stewardship is a moral responsibility.[read more]

Envisioning a New Academic Commons

February 24, 2015 by The Dirt ASLA

Academic Commons Design

Hundreds of students marked the kickoff of the fourth annual Vortex competition at the University of Virginia. Students from all disciplines at the School of Architecture gathered for a design workshop to envision a new academic commons along the Ivy Road corridor, an underused entry to the university.[read more]

Is America Changing Its Attitude Towards Adding Flats To Suburban Homes?

February 24, 2015 by Brandon Donnelly

More suburban homes are being allowed to expand

"PADs," or private accessory dwellings, is another term for nanny flat or laneway house. Whatever you may want to call it, the concept is the same. It’s about taking a single family house and adding an additional dwelling onto that same lot. And whereas they used to be disallowed, more and more they're being approved.[read more]

The Future of Public Space Analytics

February 23, 2015 by Brian Phelps

Public Space Analysis Innovation

Public space is an essential component of any great city. It brings people together to socialize, recreate, and work. It attracts people to the city, builds relationships, and spurs innovation and new ideas that fuel a city’s economic growth. How do we optimize the investments made in these spaces?[read more]