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Housing

Where Does our Affordable Housing Go?

July 30, 2014 by David Edmondson

Affordable Housing

People regularly complain that there isn’t enough affordable housing being built in the Marin area, and they blame the developer for it. Quite often, however, it’s neighborhood concerns – often quite reasonable – that drive up the cost of development.[read more]

Who Should Zone Cities?

July 30, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly

Zoning Cities

The Old Urbanist has just published an informative post called “Where Zoning Went Wrong.” In it, he talks about some of the defining characterstics of American city planning and suggests that the delegation of planning authority is what has caused many of the challenges that city builders now face.[read more]

What Will South Africa Look Like by 2030? [VIDEO]

July 30, 2014 by Future Cape Town

South Africa's Future

Given the past twenty years of democracy, many in South Africa are asking: what will come next? How will the country continue to grow and develop in an inclusive way, especially in the face of large-scale urbanization and the slowing of economic growth?[read more]

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Architects, Doctors and the Importance of Urban and Building Design in Public Health

July 28, 2014 by David Thorpe

The American Institute of Architects wants doctors to wake up to the importance of building design on health. 

Architects and the public are waking up to the way building design, urban neighbourhood design and placemaking impact upon health and well-being, but doctors are lagging behind in making the connection, according to research sponsored by the American Institute of Architects.[read more]

Battle of the Public Intellectuals: Edward Glaeser vs. Richard Florida

July 25, 2014 by Jim Russell

Intellectuals and Public Debate

Austin has a gentrification problem. Dallas has a gentrification problem. Houston has a gentrification problem. On the other hand, Brownsville looks dirt cheap. If cost of rent drives migration, then everyone in Austin should move to Pittsburgh, or Brownsville (which offers even cheaper rent than Pittsburgh).[read more]

What Is the True Value of a Vacant or Abandoned Building?

July 24, 2014 by Audrey Henderson
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The Value of Vacant Spaces

Any real estate agent or Realtor can tell you that the three most important factors in determining the potential value of a particular parcel of real estate are, in order: location, location, location. Location can trump other aspects of a structure, including whether it is occupied and its state of (dis)repair.[read more]

People-Oriented Cities: Mixed-Use Development Creates Social and Economic Benefits

People Oriented City Value

Mumbai, India can be a commuter’s nightmare. Downtown sits a full ten miles from the residential core, and the two areas are poorly linked by public transport. Mumbaikars have the longest commute of any Indian city resident, averaging more than 47 minutes each way every day.[read more]

The AirBnB Phenomenon: What's the Impact on Cities?

July 24, 2014 by This Big City

AirBnB and Urban Change

While some say AirBnB is helping build a “sharing economy” where money is redistributed to low-income individuals and small businesses, others claim it’s fueling a lucrative underground economy, promoting the evasion of taxes and contributing to an acute shortage of affordable housing.[read more]

Why Some Modernist Homes Make Bad Neighbors

July 20, 2014 by Tazmine Loomans

Modern Houses and Neighborhood Style

I grew up as an architect loving modernism and its clean lines, its spartan rectilinear shapes and its honesty of materials. But now that I’ve gotten some distance from my modernism-centric education, I see how modernism can go wrong, especially on a residential scale in established neighborhoods.[read more]

The Bus House: the Ultimate Act of Upcycling?

July 19, 2014 by Jeff McIntire-Strasburg

Upcycling the Bus House

 

As I have actually heard from numerous builders in recent years, the term “green building” has largely just become “building”: incorporating efficiency features, renewable energy systems, and natural lighting and air flow elements just make sense.[read more]

The Top 10 Mega-Cities by 2030

July 18, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly

Mega-Cities and World Urbanization

A reason I'm fascinated by cities is that it’s becoming increasingly more important to get them right. From about 1831 to 1925, London was the largest city in the world. Its population went from somewhere around 1.5 to 2 million people to nearly 7.5 million. Today our largest cities are significantly bigger.[read more]

Christoph Gielen's Aerial Photographs Document the Failures of Sprawl

July 15, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA

Aerial Sprawl Photos

In his compelling new book Ciphers, Christoph Gielen shows us the amazing shapes of suburbs, which he captures while hanging out of a helicopter. Gielen’s goal is to use his aerial photography to show us how “off-kilter” our sprawled-out communities have become.[read more]