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Land Use

Introducing the Black Tie Bicycle Test: Does Your City Pass?

April 17, 2014 by Mark K Ames

Biking In Amsterdam

I was in Amsterdam over the weekend for a family trip. It's the first time I've been to the city as a pedestrian and have not been riding a bicycle while I was in the city, and walking the streets of the Dutch capital gave me a totally different perspective.[read more]

Urban Density and Sustainability

April 17, 2014 by Christopher Berggren

Density and Sustainability

Urban density is the number of people living in a particular urban area and is an important aspect of how cities function. Many modern urban planners advocate higher densities because of the widely held theory that cities operate more efficiently when residents live in denser urban surroundings.[read more]

The Business of Cities

April 17, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly

Over the past few months on this blog, I’ve started to introduce business terms into the way I describe and talk about cities. I’ve referred to residents and visitors as customers of a city, experiences within a city as products and services, and cities themselves as businesses.[read more]

Every Street Can't Be Everything to Everyone

April 16, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly

Toronto is a city of neighborhoods and small main streets—at least in the areas where our streetcars live. Streets such as King and Queen are only 4 lanes. And the problem we’re facing is that we’re trying to accommodate every single use case on them: cars, on-street parking, cyclists and streetcars.[read more]

Cutting the Super Block Down to Size

April 16, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA

Super Blocks

To accommodate the millions coming in from the countryside each year, China’s cities are tearing down their old human-scale, socially-rich neighborhoods, with their meandering, bicycle-friendly streets, and putting in highways and incredibly isolating towers set amid vacant-feeling “super blocks.”[read more]

Baltimore's Car-Stuffed Waterfront is Poised to Keep Adding More Cars

April 16, 2014 by Jeff La Noue

Baltimore Car Culture

Fancy office towers, hotels, museums, and tourist attractions line the contours of Baltimore’s Chesapeake Bay harborfront. So too, do massive parking garages and interstate-sized roadways that feed them. What does the future hold? According to a new plan, still more parking.[read more]

The Coolest Urban Trail You are Likely to See

April 16, 2014 by Kaid Benfield

Urban Trails

Something special is happening in Indianapolis, and it's transforming neighborhoods. Revitalization when done well is almost unparalleled in its ability to boost the “triple bottom line” of sustainability: a healthy environment, a healthy economy, and a healthy and equitable social fabric.[read more]

When Hills Hide Arches

April 15, 2014 by Geoff Manaugh

Hidden Arches

Landforms masquerading as architecture and vice versa seem to dominate a few sets of older images hosted at the Library of Congress. Photos taken between 1865 and 1872, these are—photographically speaking—almost impossibly ancient.[read more]

Green Buildings Bring Vertical Forests to the City

April 15, 2014 by Derek Wong

Verticle Forests

Visually stunning and environmentally progressive condo buildings and office towers are appearing in Europe and Asia in recent years, including the Bosco Verticale in Milan, Hearst Tower in New York, and Urban Cactus in Rotterdam. Corporations and condo developers take note.[read more]

exclusive

UK Announces £1bn for Three New Garden Cities

April 15, 2014 by David Thorpe

The first ever garden city at Letchworth.

The UK government has announced that it wishes to see three new garden cities built in the south of England. It has pledged £1 billion of funding and created a new body, the Urban Development Corporation to drive forward their development, along with another garden city announced last month at Ebbsfleet, east of London.[read more]

How Did High-Speed Rail Transform China's Regional Transport Sector?

China Regional Transport

Over the course of the past few years, China has made widespread and eye-catching achievements in building the world’s largest high-speed rail system, with a total length measuring over 9000 kilometers (5,600 miles) in operation in 2012.[read more]

Marin is Growing, and Not Slowly

April 14, 2014 by David Edmondson

Marin County’s population grew by 1 percent from 2012 to 2013, slightly faster than the state and much faster than the country at large. The new numbers challenge the concept of Marin as a naturally slow-growth county. In total, Marin added about 2,500 people in 2013.[read more]