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Walkable Metro Areas Are More Productive & Command Higher Rental

July 29, 2014 by David Thorpe

Walkable is good.

A new report ranks the top 30 metropolitan areas in the USA on the amount of commercial development in Walkable Urban Places. It finds that higher education levels and one third higher GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita correlate with the provision of walkable places.[read more]

High Tree Canopy Cover Results In Fewer Heat-Related Emergencies

July 29, 2014 by Leda Marritz

Urban Tree Canopy and Health

As an MLA student at the University of Guelph, Drew Graham studied how heat-related emergency calls were distributed throughout a city. What he found was that areas with low tree canopy cover had significantly higher heat related emergencies and deaths.[read more]

Can Preparing for Climate Change have Social Benefits?

July 29, 2014 by Future Cape Town

The Benefits of Preparation

 

Kristian Foreman, founder of Zones Urbaines Sensibles, led the build up to Department of Design’s “Preparing for Climate Change” workshop with a lecture on integrating the environmental, social, and economic agenda when investments are made to prepare for Climate Change.[read more]

Bad Neighbors Build Wind Turbines

July 29, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly

Wind Turbines and Neighborhood Benefits

On Friday when I was driving up to Thornbury, I ended up taking a route that goes through Shelburne, Ontario. I’ve taken this route at some point before, but I don’t remember seeing so many wind turbines. I guess it must have been before this particular wind farm had been built out.[read more]

A New Vision for Pennsylvania Avenue

July 29, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA

U.S. Capitol and Future Vision

Pennsylvania Avenue has one of the nation’s most famous addresses – The White House, at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. It forms a physical and symbolic connection between that address, which represents the president and the executive branch, and the people, represented by the U.S. Capitol building.[read more]

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Exploding Urbanization: A Threat or an Opportunity?

July 29, 2014 by Andrew Schmidt

Sustainabile Building is the Key

The rush of humanity to live in cities need not portend a catastrophe. Initiatives such as the Sustainable Social Housing Initiative and Cities Action for Sustainable Housing exist to help cities in developing countries expand more sustainably and not repeat the mistakes of cities in developed countries.[read more]

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Architects, Doctors and the Importance of Urban and Building Design in Public Health

July 28, 2014 by David Thorpe

The American Institute of Architects wants doctors to wake up to the importance of building design on health. 

Architects and the public are waking up to the way building design, urban neighbourhood design and placemaking impact upon health and well-being, but doctors are lagging behind in making the connection, according to research sponsored by the American Institute of Architects.[read more]

Beach Pollution a Major Threat to Fisheries, Economy, and Tourism in Fortaleza, Brazil

July 28, 2014 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Beach Pollution in Brazil

The mission: picking up trash on a stretch of the Praia do Futuro (Beach of the Future in Fortaleza, Brazil). Sponsored by the Cleaning the World Organization, volunteers gathered together with gloves to protect their hands, clipboards to record their progress, and bags to be filled.[read more]

Bridging the Divide Between Vendors and Local Governments for more Inclusive Cities

Local Government and Vendor Relationships

Many cities worldwide are facing a series of challenges around informal economic activity. As they begin to modernize and transform public spaces, street vendors are often left behind or swept away. These efforts endanger not only the people who depend on the informal sector, but the city's economy.[read more]

Confusing Population Change With Migration

July 28, 2014 by Jim Russell

Populations and Migrations

Population increases, your town is a magnet. Population decreases, “brain drain” is the claim. I could provide daily fresh content in a blog about journalists, policy analysts, and academics confusing population change with net migration. Today’s demerit goes to Texas Monthly.[read more]

Helsinki Aims to Be Car-Free by 2025

July 28, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA
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Car-Free Helsinki

There is a very ambitious plan in Helsinki, Finland, to create a revolutionary “mobility on demand” system by 2025. The system would enable all “shared and public transport” to be paid for with a single payment network available via smartphones.[read more]

Ecological Landscape Design for Urban Biodiversity, Ecological Education and Nature Restoration in Kyushu, Japan

July 28, 2014 by The Nature of Cities

Japan and Urban Biodiversity

We have been designing school gardens, river banks, urban forests and city parks over the last 12 years. The aim of these projects is to create areas for children’s play, ecological education, and biodiversity preservation that can simultaneously form part of an ecological network in an urban area.[read more]

Irrational Choice Theory: The LeBron James Migration From Miami to Cleveland

July 27, 2014 by Jim Russell

LeBron James and Irrationality

 

Perhaps nothing is wrong with Miami. Perhaps when I write that a place is dying, I’m mocking the demographic ignorance that shovels dirt on shrinking cities located in the Rust Belt. Perhaps Bill Simmons should start shaving with Occam’s razor.[read more]

Adaptive Reuse of Former Breweries Brings Charm Back to Baltimore Neighborhoods

July 27, 2014 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Old Breweries in Baltimore

It’s hard to pass through Baltimore, Maryland without seeing a mural, billboard, or the giant winking head that symbolizes the once prominent brewing industry of the city’s history. Two of the largest breweries in the U.S. have remained beloved brands of the city even after closing their doors.[read more]

To Measure Summer Smog, Plant an Ozone Garden

July 27, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA

Ozone Gardens

Community Radio of Northern California asks: “What if you could look at the plants in your garden in order to learn if the air around you is clean or dirty?” Turns out the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, enables us to do just that with their new ozone garden.[read more]