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7 Reasons Why High-Rises Kill Livability

September 29, 2014 by Tazmine Loomans

High Rises and Urban Living

What do you do when you’re the city of Portland and millions of people are supposed to move into your city in the coming decades and you have an urban growth boundary? Build up, right? To a certain extent yes, but not above the fifth floor, says world-renown architect Jan Gehl.[read more]

Why You Should Worry: Five Unhappy Truths about the U.S. Food System

September 29, 2014 by Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture

Food System Problems and Risks

The convergence of processed foods, chemically intensive farming and a gas-guzzling supply chain have created a food system in the United States that would have seemed fantastical—and quite possibly nightmarish—to folks who lived in this country just a century ago.[read more]

Is Urban Revitalization Without Gentrification Possible?

September 29, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA
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Renewal and Gentrification

Cities are the place to be these days, which means big changes for the historic communities that have populated urban cores. While much of the urban renewal experiments of the 1940s through the 1960s have been deemed disasters, word is still out on the new wave of “urban revitalization."[read more]

Seven Myths About New Urbanism

September 29, 2014 by This Big City

New Urbanism Myths

Joel Kotkin, a fellow at Chapman University and an untiring defender of the suburbs, begins a recent column in the Washington Post with a perfectly valid question: “What is a city for?” He then proceeds to get that question completely wrong.[read more]

Niterói, Brazil, First City to Adopt Bus with High Level of Service (BHLS) System

September 28, 2014 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Brazil and Bus Systems

In the state of Rio de Janeiro, Niterói pioneered the use of biometrics in public transportation and could continue this trend by becoming the first city in Latin America to adopt a BHLS, (Bus with High Level of Service), the English acronym to define a bus system with high quality services.[read more]

How Are You Being Shaped?

September 28, 2014 by Brandon Donnelly
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Cities and Shape

"We shape the cities, and then our cities shape us." That’s one of my favorite lines from the documentary The Human Scale. I like it because I don’t think many of us think enough about the way in which the built environment — that we create — ultimately goes on to influence the way we live our lives.[read more]

Missouri Program Brings Fresh Food to Regional Pantries, One Seed Pack at a Time

September 28, 2014 by Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture

Seeds and Fresh Food

Grow Well Missouri has taken a simple concept – distributing seeds to people who visit a local food pantry – and started a mini-fresh food revolution. The program originated from the Interdisciplinary Center for Food Security at the University of Missouri.[read more]

Jaime Lerner's Urban Acupuncture

September 28, 2014 by The Dirt ASLA

Urban Acupuncture

Jaime Lerner, one of the most influential urban leaders of our time, has written down a great deal of all his hard-earned wisdom about the city in one slim yet rich volume, Urban Acupuncture: Celebrating Pinpricks of Change that Enrich City Life.[read more]

One Billion Pounds of Electronic Waste: a Recycling Milestone for Best Buy

September 27, 2014 by Jeff McIntire-Strasburg

Tech Waste and Recycling

The waste of electronic equipment usually contains toxic compounds and requires special handling. That special handling cost money, so if you’re going to collect these materials, you’d better have a good idea of who’ll buy them from you (hopefully, at a profit).[read more]

LA Startup Brings Custom Farming Service to Homes, Businesses

September 27, 2014 by Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture

California Urban Farming

Farmscape Gardens is California’s largest urban farming company, bringing edible gardens to residential and commercial customers alike. The sustainability focused company has reached over three-hundred clients since its inception back in 2009.[read more]

What Burning Man Taught Me About Cities

September 27, 2014 by This Big City

Burning Man and Cities

Recently 68,000 people traveled to a desert in Nevada to build a city. Within a few weeks, there will be no remains of the city: Every structure, tent, bicycle, glow stick, and piece of trash will be gone. As a first time visitor, I initially found Burning Man to be like the SimCity of social experimentation.[read more]

Bicycle Use in Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées, France: A Precarious Future?

September 27, 2014 by Global Site Plans - The Grid

Bike Use in Tououse

Is the number of people who use the bicycle as a form of transportation becoming larger and larger in the Toulouse metropolitan area? It would appear so based on reading the figures gathered and published by two local bike advocacy groups.[read more]

In Photos: Bolivia's Day of the Pedestrian and Cyclist

September 27, 2014 by TheCityFix - produced by EMBARQ

Bolivia Urban Walkability

On the first Sunday in September, 2014, cities across Bolivia closed their roads for the fourth annual “Day of the Pedestrian and Cyclist in Defense of Mother Earth.” The event, often referred to simply as the “Day of the Pedestrian,” is an expanded version of the ciclovías held in many cities.[read more]