Sign up | Login with →

Marriage Therapy for Ecologists and Landscape Architects

February 28, 2015 by The Nature of Cities

Integrating Ecology and Design

Ecologists’ interest start with an exploration of the natural world, its structure and function. Architects and landscape architects start with human needs and how constructed features can answer those needs. Of course you have these different backgrounds, and the training is so different.[read more]

SMART's New Shelter Designs are Even Worse Than Before

February 28, 2015 by David Edmondson

Shelter Design Problems?

SMART may be on the verge of making a serious mistake. Back in August, 2014, the rail agency released its “65%” plans for stations to decidedly mixed reviews. Stung by the criticism, particularly from San Rafael mayor Gary Phillips who called the designs “ridiculous”, SMART went into a long internal huddle.[read more]

Little Free Libraries and the Importance of the Unexpected

February 27, 2015 by Bradley Calvert

Little Free Libraries

The little free library embodies everything that communities and cities need to create an active and unique neighborhood. It is the real and original sharing economy and they are the origins of tactical urbanism. It is for the community good and it asks for nothing in return.[read more]

Mario Schjetnan Dissects the Deeper Meaning of Place

February 27, 2015 by The Dirt ASLA

Place and meaning in Mexico

Pioneering Mexican landscape architect, architect, and urban designer Mario Schjetnan, FASLA, who recently spoke at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, is recognized for his built works that are fueled by a deep concern for the cities of his native Mexico.[read more]

City Ecology: There Are Egrets Near the Empire State Building

February 27, 2015 by The Nature of Cities
1

You wouldn't believe where nature can thrive.

New York Harbor is a thriving natural habitat. The mixing of fresh and salt waters, combined with a rich flow of nutrients from its watershed, makes visibility poor, and hides its vitality. It is easy to make cocktail conversation about eels, oysters, humpback whales (whales!) and the other remarkable creatures that share New York City with its people.[read more]

There’s How Much Plastic In The Ocean? [INFOGRAPHIC]

February 27, 2015 by Jeff McIntire-Strasburg

Ocean Plastic and Water Health

We’ve taken a look at a number of ventures aimed at making use of plastic in the ocean, and we’d love to believe they could make a sizable dent in this pollution source. But, of course, to determine that, we’ve got to know how much plastic waste we’re putting into these ecosystems.[read more]

exclusive

Urban Demographics: Elderly Cities

February 26, 2015 by Vitor Pereira

Aging Urban Populations

Nanmoku is the city with the oldest population in Japan. It has 22,000 inhabitants, with 52.7% older than 65 years old. The leaders of this city in the Japanese province of Gunma are desperate. They urgently need young people to renew their population or else be prepared to “disappear from the map.”[read more]

Managing Tables and Chairs in the Public Realm

February 26, 2015 by Brian Phelps

Tables, Chairs, and Public Spaces

Local coffee shops vying to be the neighborhood’s “third place” understand the importance of providing tables and chairs for their customers. They understand while some people may want to lounge in sofas that, per square foot, tables and chairs are a far more useful and appealing option to a wider array of customers.[read more]

REVEALED: The Most Segregated Cities in North America

February 26, 2015 by Brandon Donnelly

North America and Urban Segregation

The Martin Prosperity Institute in Toronto has just released a new study called Segregated City: The Geography of Economic Segregation in America’s Metros that reveals the physical sorting and separation of advantaged and disadvantaged groups within cities.[read more]

Neighborhood Alliance Plans to Convert Vacant Lot into Urban Farm, Housing Complex

February 26, 2015 by Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture

Urban Food and Housing Redevelopment

The Hilltop Alliance, a nonprofit, is working on a project that could drastically advance urban agriculture in the state. The organization wants to turn a vacant 107-acre lot into Hilltop Village Farm, a multi-use development that would include 120 townhomes, a 20-acre urban farm incubator, a youth farm and CSA.[read more]

An A to Z of City Regeneration

February 26, 2015 by This Big City

Communications and Cities

In Italy there is a saying that goes “change from A to Z”, which essentially means wholesale change. Using this as a departure point would it be possible to rethink a city through the alphabet? This is what the AZ Genova initiative attempted over two days in the Italian city of Genoa.[read more]

Your Guide to Urban Cycling: A Q&A with Author Yvonne Bambrick

February 26, 2015 by TheCityFix - produced by EMBARQ

Urban Cycling Interview

As cities worldwide grow and evolve, so too is the urban landscape changing for cyclists. While congested and chaotic streets still remain a persistent challenge for some cities, many others have recognized the need for robust cycling infrastructure and are actively supporting cycling culture.[read more]

exclusive

The Smart Future of Urban Mobility

February 25, 2015 by Hussein Dia

Smart Mobility and the Future

The ability of governments to manage their infrastructure is increasingly being challenged by limited budgets and constrained resources. In an effort to manage cities more effectively and efficiently, decision makers are turning to “urban informatics” and smart infrastructure to better understand people’s mobility needs.[read more]

Architecture as if People and the Planet Mattered

February 25, 2015 by Taz Loomans

Architecture and Purpose

What if architects designed buildings as if people and the planet mattered? Maybe a developer would hire an architect to design a strip mall. And maybe that architect would insist on visiting the site and meeting with the people that would shop there and the community where the strip mall is located.[read more]

exclusive

Uber: A Sustainable Disruptor?

February 25, 2015 by John Tucker

A few years ago, “uber” meant nothing more to English speakers than a Web-savvy way to say “super” and sound cool. But now, with a capital U, it’s a part of the vernacular. Uber is the ride-sharing service that has become nearly as popular as New York’s ubiquitous yellow cab. It’s all the rage.[read more]

Density is Great, But Walkability Needs More

February 25, 2015 by Tyler Caine

Walkability isn't just about density

A relatively dense neighborhood still needs to facilitate its residents to walk to more than just their neighbors. A mixture of uses that comprise daily destinations need to be within a manageable radius in order to truly reduce net vehicle miles traveled and get people out on the street.[read more]

The Great Intensification Debate: What's Better for Cities?

February 25, 2015 by Brandon Donnelly

Cities and Intensification

Neighborhood investment needs to be a balance between preservation and progress. This doesn’t exclusively mean high-rise intensification. It could mean removing the barriers to laneway housing.[read more]

Public Health and the Road to Safety

February 25, 2015 by TheCityFix - produced by EMBARQ

Urban Traffic Safety Planning

As Michael Bloomberg, former mayor of New York City, announces a package of assistance on road safety through Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Global Safety Initiative, here is an ugly truth: India has one of the worst road safety records in the world, with around 10 percent of the world's road traffic fatalities in 2013.[read more]